Does steaming your skin help improve its condition?

Warm steam feels so good on the skin and provides many benefits. For centuries, from Greece to Rome and throughout Asia, steam has been utilized for relaxation, muscle relief and even for boosting skin vibrancy.

For a steam treatment, you can visit a professional salon for a facial featuring steam, or use a home facial steamer, which ranges from $40-$250 in cost. Hot tubs, steam rooms, showers and even a bowl of hot water covered by a towel can also be good options for getting steam on your skin. Depending on your skin type, steam can play a beneficial role for your complexion. Here are my suggestions of the best at-home steam treatments for each skin type (Plus, all of the items mentioned in this post are on sale. Shop now at http://bit.ly/1p2bU96.)

Woman Getting Facial in Spa

Combo/Oily/Blemish

Facial steaming can help open up the pores so that products penetrate easily, but it can also soften the skin, allowing whiteheads, blackheads and other debris to be extracted more easily. That’s why many professionals and estheticians utilize steam in facials and treatments. A common skin myth however is acne can be healed or treated with steam. It’s true that skin becomes softer and extractions are easier to perform, but the blockage within the skin cannot be treated or healed with steam alone.

Utilizing good anti-bacterial and anti-blemish products like the Cranberry Mud Mask in conjunction with steam will help reduce breakouts. The steam heats up the skin, opening the pores and allowing a blend of richly detoxifying Kaolin and Bentonite clays to absorb excess oil and debris, while Totarol™ purifies and balances. Cranberry extract, known as one of the “super fruits” for its high antioxidant content, helps support skin and give it a luminescent glow.

Dry

66_HCM_1.2_TubeSince steaming helps the skin become more receptive to products, dry skin can absolutely benefit from steam.  For drier skin, incorporate steam into your weekly at home spa night. Cleanse your skin and then steam for a few minutes allowing the pores to open and the circulation to enhance. Now apply the Hydrating Cactus Mask, a must have product for dry skin. Skin protecting and antioxidant-rich Prickly Pear Cactus combines with soothing Blue Agave to ease discomfort and signs of redness, while deeply hydrating and preventing moisture loss. Protection is further enhanced with Smithsonite and Malachite Stone Extracts to shield against environmental stress and pollution.

Facial steaming can even help plump up dull, dry skin but keep in mind if you steam your skin for too long your it can become dehydrated. Too much heat near your skin increases blood flow and could also lead to weakened capillaries, so  make sure the temperature of the steam is no higher than 110˚ and keep it a safe distance of 12-18 inches from the skin.

Sensitive

There is one dreadfully uncomfortable trait that comes with every variety of sensitivity: inflammation. You know the stuff: redness, discomfort and irritation. It’s no fun at all, and everything from genetics to environmental stressors and harsh skin care products can act as triggers.

Sensitive skin conditions must be handled delicately, so steam must be used with care. Using warm steam vs a hot steam will help to supply moisture to the skin but have less probability in over stimulating the skin leading to irritation. Similar to dry skin, sensitive skin can benefit from a weekly dose of steam as a tool to open the pores and stimulate the skin.

Cleanse your skin as you normally would and then steam for a few minutes allowing the pores to open. Now apply the Pure Harmony Mask loaded with Arnica, an anti-inflammatory ingredient that improves cellular circulation, provides pain relief and repairs damage associated with skin irritations. Leave on the skin and continue steaming for 5 minutes. Rinse and follow with a good hydrating cream. Your skin will look and feel great with this easy DIY treatment.

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AskOurEstyCatie Wiggy is the Director of Education for MyChelle Dermaceuticals. She has been working in the skin care industry for over 13 years as a makeup artist, brand educator, manager, innovator and licensed esthetician. She holds several certifications in esthetics and has hands-on experience with chemical peels, microdermabrasions, acne management and anti-aging treatments.